Brentwood Borough Council Leisure, Arts and Community - History of Brentwood - Armoria...

Brentwood Borough Council Leisure, Arts and Community - History of Brentwood - Armoria...

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Brentwood Borough Council

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Armorial Bearings

Brentwood CrestThe Achievement of arms was granted to the former Brentwood Urban District Council. The Armorial Bearings, which were designed by Lawrence King, OBE, FRIBA, and approved by the College of Heralds, have since been transferred to Brentwood Borough Council.

The Achievement illustrates, as far as possible, the important facts in the history of Brentwood.

The shield is divided horizontally by a flame-like division known heraldically as 'rayonee'. The lower half of the shield is red, while the upper half is silver. This division gives the appearance of flames for Brentwood's old name of 'Burnt Wood'.

The three crowns of the Abbey of St Osyth have been incorporated in the shield. The lands of Brentwood were held by the Abbey from Henry II's reign to the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

In the upper part of the shield there is a Cornish chough, a black bird with red feet. This is one of the symbols of St Thomas of Canterbury, the Patron Saint of the town, and to whom the old pilgrims' chapel in the High Street is dedicated by the name of local area Pilgrims Hatch, and the palmer's, or pilgrim's, staff has been placed on either side of the chough.

The crest above the helmet includes the battlements of an heraldic tower, intended as a rebus since the name of the late owner of the ancient manor house, Weald Hall, was Tower.

Arising from the battlement is a stag's head, reminding one of the deer which used to be seen in Weald and Thorndon Country Parks, and have now been reintroduced to Weald Country Park.

The description or blazoning of this Achievement of Arms is described in heraldic language as follows:

"Per fesse rayone, argent and gules. In chief, a Cornish chough proper between two pilgrims' staves erect sable, and in base three ancient crowns two and one or. Crest: on a wreath of the colours issuant from the battlements of a tower azure a demi stag or."

The motto: 'Ardens', meaning 'burning', is a descriptive of the name 'Burnt Wood'. 'Fide' represents our faith in God, our fellow men and our future.

Breadcrumb, my location

Armorial Bearings

The Achievement of arms was granted to the former Brentwood Urban District Council. The Armorial Bearings, which were designed by Lawrence King, OBE, FRIBA, and approved by the College of Heralds, have since been transferred to Brentwood Borough Council.

The Achievement illustrates, as far as possible, the important facts in the history of Brentwood.

The shield is divided horizontally by a flame-like division known heraldically as 'rayonee'. The lower half of the shield is red, while the upper half is silver. This division gives the appearance of flames for Brentwood's old name of 'Burnt Wood'.

The three crowns of the Abbey of St Osyth have been incorporated in the shield. The lands of Brentwood were held by the Abbey from Henry II's reign to the time of the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

In the upper part of the shield there is a Cornish chough, a black bird with red feet. This is one of the symbols of St Thomas of Canterbury, the Patron Saint of the town, and to whom the old pilgrims' chapel in the High Street is dedicated by the name of local area Pilgrims Hatch, and the palmer's, or pilgrim's, staff has been placed on either side of the chough.

The crest above the helmet includes the battlements of an heraldic tower, intended as a rebus since the name of the late owner of the ancient manor house, Weald Hall, was Tower.

Arising from the battlement is a stag's head, reminding one of the deer which used to be seen in Weald and Thorndon Country Parks, and have now been reintroduced to Weald Country Park.

The description or blazoning of this Achievement of Arms is described in heraldic language as follows:

"Per fesse rayone, argent and gules. In chief, a Cornish chough proper between two pilgrims' staves erect sable, and in base three ancient crowns two and one or. Crest: on a wreath of the colours issuant from the battlements of a tower azure a demi stag or."

The motto: 'Ardens', meaning 'burning', is a descriptive of the name 'Burnt Wood'. 'Fide' represents our faith in God, our fellow men and our future.