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Brentwood Borough Council

FOI 7324

Temporary Event Notices

Request

· How many primary/junior schools (up to and including 11 years old) in the Brentwood Borough Council area have applied for a Temporary Event Notice (TEN) between 01 April 2012 and 31 March 2013 to sell/serve alcohol to adults at events where children will be present? For example, school fetes and school discos

· Of those who applied during that time period, how many schools were granted TEN licences and how many were rejected?

· Between 01 April 2012 and 31 March 2013, how many Temporary Event Notices (TENs) have been requested by primary/junior schools (pupils up to and including 11 years old) in the Brentwood Borough Council area wanting to sell/serve alcohol to adults at events where children will be present? For example, school fetes and school discos

· Of those applications received, how many were granted and how many were rejected?

Response

I refer to your freedom of information request with regard to the numbers of Temporary Event Notices (TENs) submitted in respect of the sale of alcohol at Brentwood School events between 1 April 2012 and 31 March 2013.

A total of 28 notifications were submitted during the stated period, however, we have no means of knowing whether children were to be present at any of these events as it is not a requirement of the notification that this information is provided.

You have requested further information to indicate of those that ‘applied’ how many were ‘granted’. The temporary event system is not one that requires an application as such and these notices are not granted by the local authority. To explain this, the system of TENs provides for a notification by the applicant that an event is taking place. The licensing authority is the duty bound to sign a copy and return this to the notifyer by the end of the day following receipt of the TEN. Provided they submit the notification in time and have not exceeded certain limits with regard to the numbers of previous events held at the same premises this is all that is required to legally conduct a licensable activity.

The licensing authority has no power to intervene in a TEN unless there are objections from either the police (usually but not exclusively concerned with crime and disorder) or Environmental Health (usually but not exclusively concerned with noise and/or Health and Safety issues). There are no other persons or authorities permitted by law to object to a TEN.

As the TENs system is intended to be a light touch system (as described by the guidance) there are very few grounds to intervene. School events are generally well organised with no complaints that I am aware of ever being received in respect of any such event. On this basis there have never been any objections to such events by either of the two authorities that may object and therefore we have never refused a notification for any School.